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Kale and Tomato Clafoutis

It’s only been a little more than 1 month ago since we officially launched this blog, and it has been a lot of fun. We’ve been exploring and experimenting with exciting vegetables, flavours, and consistencies, and today’s recipe is no exception.
But before we move on to the recipe we just want to say a big THANK YOU to all of our readers! We are so grateful for all of your attention, support and sweet comments on the blog, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Steller, and wherever we bump into you. It has really boosted our spirit and beliefs that we are on the right track. We couldn’t have asked for more!

kale-pancake

And now; the recipe! Those of you who know clafoutis probably also know that originally it’s a baked French dessert made from a pancake batter filled with sweet cherries. We like the idea of pancakes for dinner, so we changed the recipe a bit. Well, a lot, actually. The result is a gluten-free, savoury version filled with kale, tomatoes, and feta. It sort of resembles a vegetable pie, except it feels fluffy and a bit lighter.

Kale is super healthy and in season right now. It comes in a variety of colours as well, which allows it to double as a punchy salad side dish. If you are not all that into kale, using spinach instead of kale in the clafoutis works really well, too.

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Kale, Tomato, and Feta Clafoutis

(Makes 4 servings)

1/2 cup chickpea flour 1/2 cup buckwheat flour 1 1/4 cup milk 4 eggs 100 g feta, crumbled 6 stalks of kale, rough part of stem removed, and coarsely chopped 2 tomatoes, finely chopped 1 handful parsley, finely chopped 1 onion, finely chopped 2 garlic gloves, finely chopped 1 tsp cumin seeds 6 curry leaves 1/2 tsp nutmeg 1 tbsp olive oil salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 400 F/200 C. Start by making the pancake batter; Add flour, 1 tsp salt, and eggs to a large bowl. Add a bit of the milk and mix until well combined. Make sure there is no flour lumps at this point. Add the rest of the milk one bit at the time while whisking until well combined. Set aside for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat oil in a large saucepan. Add onion, garlic, and curry leaves. Lower the temperature and cook for a few minutes until the onions start to soften. Add tomatoes, kale, parsley, cumin seeds, curry leaves, and nutmeg. Cover and let simmer until the tomatoes start to soften. Stir occasionally. Taste with salt and pepper.

Transfer the vegetables to the pancake batter when they have cooled for a few minutes. Add feta and combine well. Cover a 20 x 25 cm baking tray in baking paper. Transfer the batter to the baking tray and bake in the oven for about 30 minutes. Prepare the salad in the meantime.

Tip: If you prepare the kale salad too, roast the walnuts in the oven next to the clafoutis when there’s 10 minutes left of the baking time.

Kale and Tomato Salad with Mustard Dressing

(Makes 4 servings)

6 stalks of kale
500 g mixed tomatoes, chopped
1 handful walnuts
1 tsp mustard
2 tsp honey
2 tsp lemon juice
2 tbsp olive oil
Salt and Pepper

Roast the walnuts for 10 minutes at 400 F/200 C.

Make the dressing by mixing and whisking mustard, honey, lemon juice, and olive oil. Taste with salt and pepper.

Tear the kale leaves into small pieces and discard the rough middle stem. ‘Massage’ the kale leaves with the dressing in a large salad bowl (doing so will soften the kale and ease the digestion). Add tomatoes and walnuts to the kale and mix well.

2 Comments

  • Ksenia @ At the Immigrant's Table
    30. September 2014 at 17:10

    I happen to have all the ingredients for this on hand! So at least I know what one dinner this week will look like. Also, do you think corn flour would work in place of the chickpea flour (the only thing here I don’t have on hand)?

    Reply
    • Blueberry Tales
      30. September 2014 at 18:24

      Hi Ksenia,How wonderful – We can’t wait to hear what you think of it! And yes, you could definitely replace chickpea flour with corn flour. We used chick pea flour for this recipe mainly due to the high levels of protein, but other types of flours like corn or nut flours will make great alternatives 🙂

      Best,
      Camilla

      Reply

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